ss1_fs
Hop seedlings emerge in the greenhouse in preparation of planting a new hop yard.
ss2_fs
Another method of planting a new hop yard – the hop rhizome.
ss3_fs
New growth emerges from the ground in the spring and starts to climb skyward.
ss4_fs
Hops climb ever-higher in a clockwise spiral motion up the twine.
ss5_fs
A hop yard strung with coir yarn to accommodate the fast growing hop vines.
ss6_fs
Hops climbing toward the top of the eighteen-foot tall trellis system.
ss7_fs
As the hops reach the top, they produce lateral shoots that produce hop flowers.
ss8_fs
A hop yard that has topped out, developed laterals, and is filling in with full growth.
ss9_fs
Clusters of hop cones develop in the hop yard and start to gain size and weight.
ss10_fs
A photo of the ever-amazing hop cone. Full of flavor and aroma.
ss11_fs
A mobile harvester in the field ready to start the annual harvest season.
ss12_fs
The harvester moves through the hop yard gently removing the vines from the trellis.
ss13_fs
A view from the operator’s seat of the mobile harvesting unit.
ss14_fs
The hop cones are separated from the leaf and vine material in the cleaning station, leaving only the hop cones.
ss15_fs
Hop cones are laid in to heated hop kilns where they are carefully dried.
ss16_fs
Dried and cooled hop cones are packaged in to bales weighing two-hundred pounds each.